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David R Davies

David R Davies

David Randal Davies, who also exhibits as David Randal, was born in Penclawdd on the north of the Gower Peninsula.  He studied at the Swansea College of Art and later did post-graduate research at Cardiff College of Art.  He also holds a Master's degree in education from the University of Wales. For over twenty years he was Head of Art at a large South Wales comprehensive school and also taught extra mural classes for the University College, Swansea.

David has always drawn a great deal, and these studies, particularly of people, form the basis of many of his paintings, whether in oils, acrylics or watercolour. He has exhibited at the Wales Drawing Biennale on three occasions as well as at the Cheltenham Open Drawing Exhibition.  Drawings from the latter were also shown in Berlin.

He has exhibited widely throughout the United Kingdom, particularly in London and he has had many exhibitions in Wales. His work has regularly been selected for the "Welsh Artist of the Year" exhibition and in 2009 was selected for the "Kyffin Williams Drawing Prize" exhibition. 

He has won several prizes for his paintings, which have been regularly selected for national exhibitions such as the Singer Friedlander/Sunday Times Competition (seven exhibitions), and the Discerning Eye (seven exhibitions) both held at the Mall Galleries, London.  In 2008, his painting for the Discerning Eye Exhibition at Mall Galleries, won a prize as the best painting from Wales. Iin 2011 art critic Brian Sewell, personally selected one of David's paintings for showing in this competition.

"My paintings are mainly about people and their everyday lives.  Many images have emerged from early, vivid memories of village life, singers, miners, cockle-pickers and the estuary.  Others are the result of studies made during travels in Europe and Egypt.  However, whatever the location or subject, whatever the interpretation, abstracted or representational, a painting is essentially a configuration of lines, shapes and colours.  The arrangement of these elements into a coherent whole constitutes the real, rather than the overt, subject which may have been the original stimulus."